Please don’t tell me they really do that

Having a pair of foxes treat your garden as their territory is not an easy thing to live with, and it got to the stage where the attacks on our hens became almost a daily occurence and in broad daylight every time. They weren’t always successful, but then one particular killing made me realise, we were dealing with an unnatural invader – a released town fox, had to be.

Now I have lived in the countryside all my adult life. I love nature, I love my wildlife and when keeping livestock you do your upmost to keep them safe but when you’re up against something that doesn’t belong there, the natural balance of the area is thrown.

Never in my life did I think I would witness a fox kill a cockerel right in front of me, but that’s exactly what happened. I’d let the ‘girls’ and Stan out for a run as I was there with them. Half past one in the afternoon it was, in our garden with me just a couple of feet away from him. You’d think a screaming woman with arms flailing would do the trick, but no and then came an image which will stay with me for a very long time.

I had been in touch with the local farmer but it’s difficult to come out in the day when you’ve got work to do, but the next day the vixen was back this time, again in the garden. No hens out and me by a phone which saw the farmer come round in 10 minutes, and within another 10, vixen was shot and killed.

Where the dog fox is I don’t know, possibly gone to look for another mate, we’ll wait and see but following a few enquiries, it appears that farmer friends have had similar happenings, including one in the summer who had a fox go for him in his yard. Going back to his house to get his gun, on return it went for him again and once dead, my pal could see how skinny it was and then the shocker – poor creature only had three legs, the other one had been professionally amputated! The animal wouldn’t have stood a chance of survival, who in their right mind had done that? Also another friend was telling me about a hired gun who had shot a dog fox, only to find he’d been castrated!

If town foxes are being caught and then released in the countryside then it is immoral, cruel, wrong, going against nature, irresponsible – the list goes on. My thoughts for the short term are with the lambs which are due, they won’t stand a chance against a fox with no fear and that’s the problem – they should be scared, that’s how the balance of nature works.

The people and organisations who think they’re doing good – they haven’t a ruddy clue.

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Fox 1 – Hedgebottom Hens 0 – which is also the score for the Dairy Farmers

Well he’s been, and in broad daylight too. Killed one, traumatised another and if anyone asks if hens remember – judging by the response of the one that I mentioned in the previous post, then yes they do. I really do not like foxes. Fortunately I was able to run and yell at the same time (perhaps I’m not that unfit then!) which saved the others. One hen’s reaction surprised me, she was standing on the fence, brave as you like, looking in the direction of where her pal had been taken, clucking away as if she was telling him off.

We’ve certainly had snow overnight, fair few inches too so I’ll be looking out for his footprints.

Speaking of the white stuff, yet again I see milk prices in the news yet still nothing seems to be done about it. Way we’re going we’ll have no dairy farms left, and our milk will be imported and believe me, a fair few manufacturers have been attempting this for several years, fortunately with no success, but you just know it’ll happen.

I began my career in dairy farming, including 2 stints at Agricultural College with the second in Dairy Herd Management. I worked hard, it was cold, it was hot, I smelt, I didn’t go out in the evening other than to check my cows, I got up very early in the morning, worked 72 hours a week, sometimes I’d have every other weekend off but living on the farm I’d still be checking the girls at night. I took pride in how clean our milk was produced, I loved the close bond that develops with each cow, I got kicked at when a new heifer came into the parlour but she’d be a calf I reared 2 years ago so we’d soon work it out. I cried many times when saying goodbye be it ill health or age. I loved ‘turn out’ when they’d head back into the fields having been indoors for winter and see them all excited and then remember to dodge their change of diet poo in the parlour! I watched them, I knew them, I cared for them, each had their own personality and Dairy Farmers do this day in day out – and because of all of the above. When I milked cows from 1982 to 1996, we were receiving more for our milk than they do today, how can that be possible, then again, how can bottled mineral water be more expensive than milk?!

Times like this I do wish I was still on the wireless, just to lend a voice – but then when I was, I remember the topic coming up several times yet still nothing is being done. If you can, please buy local milk as there are quite a few that bottle their own. The trusty Milkman, bring him back or if you want to contact your local superstore, do it and tell family and friends to join in too. Farmers are custodians of our countryside, please don’t let the supermarkets dictate the lactate!

January – how did that happen

Hard to comprehend the recent events in Paris, my thoughts and prayers certainly with them and humanity as a whole and judging by the scenes of all those people at the march yesterday, humanity definitely won.

I’m not sure how it happened, but we’re nearly at the mid way point of January and as yet, I don’t feel I’ve got going! All the Christmas ‘friends’ were put away on time (other than the odd one that you seem to find a good 2 weeks later), the weather hasn’t been that bad and the phone is still ringing for work which is always comforting. It might have something to do with the start of the year when it was greeted in by Libby our Retriever being struck down with a rather nasty bug and for the first time in years, I ended up spending the night on the settee with her – glad to report she is now back to normal and an order has been put in for a new settee!

It’s that time of year to keep extra vigilent if you’ve got hens as foxes are pairing up now, and already our neighbour has lost all but one of hers. Out of the 6 killed, only 2 bodies were taken which makes me think she was visited by a pair and they carried away one each. I struggle with foxes, if they’re hungry then I can understand the killing and eating of one bird, but but they don’t stop at that, they slaughter the others, almost for fun which I hate and having witnessed one in torch light circling a new born calf as she was suckling her Mum, I really do not like to see them anywhere near my stock.
I had a close encounter just before Christmas when I heard one of my hens in distress, heading down the garden and there she was running towards me with said fox right behind her and only 2 feet away from me, not sure who was more surprised.
Our snowdrops are just beginning to emerge and I’ve even seen the bud of a daffodil. We seem to have an even larger population of Goldfinches at the moment and glad to see the return of the Nuthatch.
We’ve had a bit of snow, I suspect we’ll get hit with it over the next few weeks – as long as they can deliver my settee, I’ll be happy!